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Category Archive for 'Gabriel Garcia Marquez'

This semester I’ve been learning not only how to write, but how to live. Sure, there have been a lot of great metaphors, similes, and stories that exemplify what I wish I could write. Millhauser has a way with endings, which are the most infuriating portion of any story I’ve ever attempted to write. Johnson […]

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On the advice of a friend, Crane filed suit; the case was decided against him, but the product was withdrawn after the parents of children with Animate Paint sets discovered that a simple stroke of chrome-yellow or crimson lake suddenly took on a life of its own, streaking across the page and dripping brightly onto […]

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He arrived one night on horseback. He dismounted, or fell off, more like; happens to all of them, after ten long hours in the saddle through dune, marsh, and peat bog. Whether you’re a gypsy making a trip to the town of Macondo in One Hundred Years of Solitude or the famous man visiting the […]

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And then he saw the child. It was a dry and bloated bag of skin that all the ants in the world were dragging toward their holes along the stone path in the garden. Aureliano could not move. Not because he was paralyzed by horror but because at that prodigious instant Melquíades’ final keys were […]

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Gabriel Garcia Marquez has imagined a world that is boiling over with the fantastic, while managing to maintain an unwavering sense of reality in One Hundred Years of Solitude. The story of the town of Macondo, from birth to resolution, is formatted like a tale you’d hear while sitting around a camp fire or like […]

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This book, in the beginning, read like a very long biblical story. Initially, I wondered if the focus of the story would be on the lives of its characters, entrenched in an existence worthy of retelling, though in a surrounding that was exotic but entirely plausible. The shining moment of the book, in my opinion, […]

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There are so many instances of understatement, beautiful imagery, juxtaposition, and ridiculous logic in this book that make the fantastic elements believable. In this world, the dead travel with maps, chocolate is sufficient fuel for levitation, blood defies physics, lawyers bend reality, and the old fortune teller is actually right. Garcia Marquez fills the story […]

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Garcia Marquez includes in the novel facts which if attributed to any place but Macondo would seem outlandish exaggerations. It rained for four years, eleven months, and two days. (314) One Friday at two in the afternoon the world lighted up with a crazy crimson sun as harsh as brick dust and almost as cool […]

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I was impressed throughout this novel by how nonchalantly Garcia Marquez mentioned the occurance of fantastic events. He casually and for no apparent reason includes in his description of Úrsula having her husband moved into the house for his final days the information that not only was [José Arcadio Buendía] as heavy as ever, but […]

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“Light it with this,” he told her, handing her the first roll of yellowish papers. “It will burn better because they’re very old things.” (page 174) In a book that spans more than one hundred years, it’s natural that there will be some old people, old things, old papers, and old stories. Of course there […]

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‘We have still not had a death,’ he said. ‘A person does not belong to a place until there is someone dead under the ground.’ -Jose Arcadio Buendia, One Hundred Years of Solitude,  pg.13 Where he built his wife a bedroom without windows so that the pirates of her dream would have no way to […]

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He felt Amaranta’s fingers searching across his stomach like warm and anxious little caterpillars. Pretending to sleep, he changed his position to make it easier, and then he felt the hand without the black bandage diving like a blind shellfish into the algae of his anxiety. (page 142) Okay, I’ll go there. This may very […]

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“The Night of the Curlews” felt like a horrible nightmare.  These three men had their eyes pecked out by curlews.  No one would help them or believe them, so they wandered aimlessly.  All they had was their senses, and Garcia Marquez was able to describe those senses with his beautiful language.  The sensations that the […]

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From the moment in which she entered the room Ursula felt inhibited by the maturity of her son, by his aura of command, by the glow of authority that radiated from his skin. She was surprised that he was so well-informed. “You knew all along that I was a wizard,” he joked. And he added […]

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“Someone told him that it did not belong to anyone, that in former times a solitary widow who fed on earth and white-wash from the walls had lived there, and that in her last years she was seen only twice on the street with a hat of tiny artificial flowers and shoes the color of […]

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  While reading Kij Johnson’s “Schrödinger’s Cathouse,” I was surprised to find elements in her story that coincided with Gabriel Garcia Marquez’s “A Very Old Man with Enormous Wings.” Both stories begin with a common place activity and then something bizarre happens to the main characters that shakes their seemingly average lives to the core. […]

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A Dreamy Relationship

What can be more fantastic than a dream? Dreams are one of the most symbolic, interesting functions of the human’s creative mind. Gabriel Garcia Marquez’s story “Eyes of a Blue Dog” shows the relationship between two people within the narrator’s head. The thing I love most about this story is that Garcia Marquez created two […]

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“Eyes of A Blue Dog”

I think that one of the reasons why this story is so compelling to me is that the fantastic element is not overwhelming factor in the story. That is not so suggest that, somehow, the other works of Chateaureynaud, Johnson, and Millhauser are overly blunt in how they approach the fantastic. Instead, it’s just particularly […]

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Then I saw her lower her eyes again and remain with her eyes always on her brassiere, not talking. And I said to her again: “I see you.” And she raised her eyes from her brassiere again. “That’s impossible,” she said. I asked her why. And she, with her eyes quiet and on her brassiere […]

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“Eyes of a Blue Dog”

From the beginning, Garcia Marquez lets us know that something fantastic is happening in this story. The way he describes the manner in which the woman moves around the room makes her seem like she could be a ghost appearing to the man in the middle of the night, but then the way the man […]

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